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Cuisine - New Mexican
Although new to many people, these colorful beans date back to the ancient, cliff-dwelling Anasazi Indians. Slightly sweeter than pinto beans, they also tend to hold their shape better when cooked. If not available, substitute pinto beans in this recipe.
Here’s a great rub to use on meats that will be smoked or grilled. Since anchos are sold in fairly pliable condition, place them in the oven on low heat until they are brittle.
When I write “flavored,” I mean it, as I have chosen the chiles that 
impart the most distinct flavors. The raisiny flavor of the pasilla
melds with the apricot overtones of the habanero and the earthiness of
the New Mexican chile to create a finely-tuned fiery sipping vodka. Of
course, use an excellent vodka like Stolichnaya or Absolut. Note: This
recipe requires advance preparation.
Although history doesn’t reveal the origin of these cookies, it’s believed that they were created by the descendants of the early Spanish settlers in New Mexico. Traditionally they are served at the holiday season and can be found gracing tables after the lighting of the luminaries on Christmas Eve. They are so popular that they have been declared the Official State Cookie. New Mexico is probably the only state that has one! These flaky cookies with a hint of anise must be prepared with lard for the traditional taste, although shortening can be substituted.
Three distinctive flavors combine and complement one another in these muffins--the saltiness of the bacon, the nutty flavor of the blue corn, and a subtle chile heat that is not immediately discernable. These muffins need not be served at breakfast only. They compliment almost any chile dish, barbecue, or Southwest meal. You can substitute yellow corn meal for the blue if blue cornmeal is unavailable.
Pizza for breakfast-why not? After all, Italians love cold pizza with hot cappuccino for breakfast. But rather than cold pepperoni, I&rquo;m proposing a hearty and hot breakfast pie. Use frozen prepared dough and hash browns for easy, quick assembly.

This recipe, along with other sizzling holiday snacks, can be found in the article

Sizzling Snacks for Holiday Entertaining by Dave DeWitt

pumpkin seeds

For hundreds of years squash and corn have been the staples of the Pueblo Indians in northern New Mexico, and in this popular dish, they are combined with chile. The delicate flavor of the corn and squash with the bite of the chile is a combination that can act as a basis for other variations. Use different types of summer squash, add cheese such as cheddar, Monterey jack, or feta, and/or chicken to turn this recipe from a side dish into an entree.

This thick and hearty stew from Durango, one of the northern states, is another Mexican dish that closely resembles chili con carne. A very similar recipe, carne guisada, is given by Jim Peyton in his book, El Norte: The Cuisine of Northern Mexico. We use pork in our version, but beef (or even shredded beef) can be used.

This simple but tasty dish evolved from the need to preserve meat without refrigeration since chile acts as an antioxidant and prevents the meat from spoiling. It is a very common restaurant entree in New Mexico.

Note: This recipe requires advance preparation.

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