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I don't know about you, but I like to nibble on sweet, salty, and tangy vegetable pickles with my meals. They help digest food and provide balance during the meal, especially when you are eating starchy foods like noodles. They also whet the appetite, which is probably why they are served the minute you sit down in many Asian restaurants. I call for kirby, Persian, or Japanese cucumbers, all of which are slender when compared to regular cucumbers. Kirby and Persian pickles are 4 to 5 inches long, while Japanese cucumbers are a couple of inches longer. The pickling liquid here is traditionally used for pickling sliced cucumber, carrots, and daikon, so feel free to try these vegetables as well. The amount of pickling liquid may look inadequate, but there will be enough because the cucumbers give up some of their natural water while sitting in the brine.
We found that it complemented both beef and fish tacos.

This recipe is from Zaire, where its is know as "Senegalese Quiche."  Feel free to choose another hot sauce to serve over this dish.

Just a great salsa!

Marinades can also be used for cooking without the use of heat such as in ceviche. They work by breaking down the tough connective tissues and firming the protein, the same effect that heat has. Foods without resistant connective tissues, such as fish, can be "cooked," or technically pickled, in this way. Only buy the freshest of fish for ceviche and I always freeze the fish overnight before thawing and using, just to be on the safe side.

This gazpacho is a refreshing and spicy blend of shrimp, avocado, tomatoes, cilantro and lime! Crab meat or lobster could be substituted for the shrimp. Don’t substitute dried cilantro for fresh as the flavor will be entirely different. Serve with Chile Lime Garlic Shrimp to make an unforgettable shrimp cocktail.

recipe image

This is a dry cure that can be used on about five pounds of pork bellies or fish such as salmon. Read more about making bacon in Mike Stines' article here.

This recipe appeared in the article "Retro-Grilling" by Dr. BBQ, Ray Lampe. Learn more about Dr. BBQ on his website here. This one's for my Dad. Martinis will never go out of style.  And regardless whether you prefer gin or vodka as the liquor of choice, it's difficult to just drink one.

Photo by Norman Johnson

This sauce for barbequed poultry and meats originated in North Africa.  It is named after the Berbers, a North African Tribe who were renowned for their great skill as horsemen.  This is great as a marinade and baste for grilled lamb chops.
Here's our kicked-up version of this classic Caribbean cocktail.
 

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