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Cooking Method - No Cook
This cool soup with a spicy bite is very refreshing on a hot day. Technically not really cooking, it's a great way to "recycle" any leftover salsa. For a creamier gazpacho, add a ripe avocado.
Leftover turkey breast is a lot more exciting when served with this cranberry salsa.
Horseradish is a classic condiment that’s served with roast meats—beef 
in particular—and cooked or raw vegetables. Since horseradish is very
volatile (the active ingredient is isothiocyanate) and loses its flavor
and aroma quickly, this simple sauce should be made close to serving
time. For an added hit of chile heat, I sometimes add ground habanero chile.
The use of watercress gives this dressing peppery overtones, and the jalapeños are what really gives it some zing. It is good served over salad greens, as well as poured over tender-crisp cooked vegetables such as asparagus. You might even like it as a dip for carrots, jicama, turnip spears, and celery.
This recipe and others can be found in the 12-part illustrated series "A World of Curries". You can read all about this unique Indian flavor here.

recipe image
This is the sweet heat dessert that perfectly finished the shrimp dish at Cuvée. Chef Dean says that you can use lemon, lime, or grapefruit, juice, or a combination. I’ll bet you could use orange juice if you wished.
If you can't find the Datil Dew Burgundy Mustard, use any mustard with chile peppers in it.

Note that there are hundreds of olive varieties, some might work better than others. Results may vary, so start with small quantities. And as with any produce that you plan to preserve, use only fresh, ripe  and spotless fruit. Read the entire article from Harald Zoschke on the Burn! Blog here.

This recipe appeared in the article "Retro-Grilling" by Dr. BBQ, Ray Lampe. Learn more about Dr. BBQ on his website here. This seasoning can be rubbed on steak immediately before grilling.

Jerk seasoning is actually a delicious, tropical way to barbecue. Use it to season either pork or poultry; simply rub into the meat, marinate overnight in the refrigerator, grill (or bake), and then enjoy!
 

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