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This recipe and others can be found in the following article:

Where Africa Meets India: Fiery Durban Curry

By Diana Armstrong 

 

This recipe comes from Mount Horeb Mustard Museum. If you want it really hot, use piquin chiles.
In tiny Bathsheba on the wild Atlantic coast, Enid Worrell creates some of the best Bajan cuisine at her establishment, the Bonito Bar and Restaurant. She was kind enough to give us her recipe for corned--or pickled--bonney peppers. The vinegar acquires the heat of the peppers, and then it’s sprinkled over fish or curries. The pickled peppers are chopped up and used when fresh ones are not available. Note: This recipe requires advance preparation.

This creamy sauce delivers a double punch, from the horseradish and the chile. Serve it as an accompaniment to grilled salmon, poached fish, prime rib, or even corned beef. Horseradish is very volatile and loses its flavor and aroma quickly, so this sauce should be made just before serving.

This dish was originally designed to cool down very hot curries, but then adventurous cooks had the idea to spice it up! Go figure. Serve this as a condiment.
Variation: For a milder margarita with the flavor of jalapeños but not the heat, substitute New Mexico Jalapeño Wine for the fiery tequila.

Horseradish is a root, similar to wasabi, and a member of the mustard family. Prepared horseradish is grated horseradish root combined with distilled vinegar. It has almost no taste until grated when the cells are crushed to release a volatile oil that produces the “heat.”

Use as a topping for soups and noodles, or as a refreshing salad dressing. Store leftovers in a tightly sealed container in the refrigerator. The sauce will stay fresh for weeks if refrigerated.

For some reason, habanero chiles work particularly well with fruits. 
These daiquiris will delight chileheads, who will probably suggest
adding more habanero to the blender! For a non-alcoholic version of this
drink, substitute pineapple juice for the rum and decrease the sugar to
3 tablespoons. From the article Perfectly Pungent Peaches by Dave DeWitt here.
 

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