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Ingredient - Pork

Sizzlin' Sauces' Mojo's Tapenade blends Kalamata olives with sun dried tomatoes into a great spread that goes wonderfully with not just French bread but also burgers and dogs. If you want something sweeter, try the Razing Cane Garlic Relish. It's sweet, sour, and has just a hint of habanero. Recently, Mark Masker snuck some of each into the Italian sausage sandwiches he was grilling up before a game for some friends and they loved it.

A Recipe From:

America's Best BBQ:

100 Recipes from America's Best Smokehouses, Pits, Shacks, Rib Joints, Roadhouses, and Restaurants

 

by Ardie A. Davis and Chef Paul Kirk


This recipe and other can be found in the Book Excerpt: America's Best BBQ

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The "jerk" in jerk pork is a spice mixture that was used to preserve meat before refrigeration. It was developed by the Awarak Indians, and later refined in Jamaica by runaway slaves known as Maroons. These days, the spices are used to season meats for barbecue and to tenderize rather than to preserve. An inexpensive smoker or a covered grill can be substituted for the traditional jerk pit, and is a lot easier than digging a pit in your yard. Note: This recipe required advance preparation.

James Beck of eatmoreheat.com concocted this seriously hot take on mac ‘n cheese. Of course, for you wimpy Denny’s-loving mama’s boys out there, you can reduce the amount of pepper-bearing cheese materiel and substitute plain old cheese.

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This recipe and others can be found in the article "In Hawaii, Barbecue Means a Luau" by Mike Stines, Ph.B.

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Long ends are the lean, thin bones of spareribs, while short ends are the shorter, fatter, meatier hind sections. The combination of the rub and finishing sauce is traditional in Kansas City-style barbecue. The sauce is sometimes slathered over the ribs during the last half hour of smoking and is always served on the side. Why not serve these ribs with french fried, corn on the cob, spicy baked beans, and hot peach cobbler for dessert?
This recipe and others can be found in the article "In Hawaii, Barbecue Means a Luau" by Mike Stines, Ph.B.

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The technique of soaking a food in a liquid to flavor it—or in the case of meats, to tenderize the cut—was probably brought to the Caribbean by the Spanish. A marinade is easier to use than a paste, and when grilling your jerk meats, the marinade can also be used as a basting sauce.  “In Jamaica,” notes food writer Robb Walsh, “like Texas barbecue, jerk is served on butcher paper and eaten with your hands.”  Serve this version of jerk with a salad and grilled plantains.

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Here's a manageable size with all the same great ingredients as the big one.  The original was made of Italian sausage, which is always 100 percent pork.
 

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