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Cooking Method - Sauté
West African cooking quite often uses the mixture of chiles and peanuts, which are called groundnuts there. This unusual soup uses peanut butter as the peanut source and is one that you can have it on the table in under an hour. Don’t eliminate mixing the peanut butter with a little of the soup before adding to the pot, or the mixture may curdle.
These meatballs fall into a class of tapas called "cosas de picar." Named after the picks that the picadors use during a bull fight, the term refers to those tapas that are served with toothpicks. In Spain, they would be made with minced meat, but since ground meats are more readily available, I use a combination of ground pork and beef. Traditionally these are made with paprika, but since I like my foods a little more spicy, I also add ground cayenne.

Extra stuffing may be put in a buttered casserole dish and baked, covered, at 350 degrees F. for about 30 minutes.

In this land of the pampas and gauchos, beef is king. And beef is a traditional filling for empanadas that are a very popular appetizer, snack and/or picnic fare in Argentina. This recipe is rather similar to a Puerto Rican picadillo, so substitute pork if you wish.

No matter how you spell it—shisk kabob or sis kebabi—this robust specialty features skewered chunks of meat and onions marinated in oil and spices and then grilled over an open flame. The technique apparently originated in the Caucasus and then spread southward to Mediterranean countries. The traditional meat has always been leg of lamb, a meat that seems to be permitted by most major religions. To make a perfect kabob, remove any tough membrane from the meat, cut meat across the grain—and don’t forget that the meat must be marinated before grilling. Serve with a salad of tossed greens, ripe olives, and feta cheese and for dessert, baklava and Turkish coffee.

This recipe from Chef V. Morin, who writes, "avocado is an awesome fruit. I like avocado for breakfast it is full of vitamin A. and it can be made into an incredible mousse as well, served with seared shrimp or scallops and your favorite chile. I like Chipotle. Check out one of my favorite recipes for Avocado Mousse. Enjoy !!!"

See more avocado recipes in the article Avocado Madness!

Lamb axoa is a recipe typical of the Basque region, prepared in the same fashion as a stew. In France, lamb tongue and hooves are used to further flavor the dish, but I have omitted them here. Serve with a crusty French bread and red wine. Again, substitute hot paprika or New Mexican red chile powder for the Espelette. If you wish to make this more of a stew, add two potatoes, finely chopped, and double the bouillon.

Grilled beans! What will they think of next? We’re not suggesting you grill them bean by bean, but rather these are little bean torpedos bound together by mushrooms and bread crumbs. And go ahead, use black beans, kidney beans, whatever. Shape them into patties and serve them on hamburger buns. The chipotles in the sour cream add just the smoky flavor needed to complete the grilled bean experience. Serve with a corn and poblano chile strips salad and Mexican rice.

"Chop" is an Afican Slang word for food or meal, and this recipe fits that term because it is a big meal!  It contains some of the most basic ingredients of West Africa with garnishes similar to curry dishes--another food influence in Africa.  In West Africa, the beef would probably be substituted with wild game, buffalo, antelope, etc.  Use your imagination here in North America--elk, venison, antelope, or lamb.  Serve the huge pot of stew and incredible condiments buffet style.
To preserve the distinctive flavor of the habaneros, don't cook them 
with the sauce but add them afterwards. This sauce will keep for weeks
in the refrigerator. Use it to spice up eggs, sandwiches, soups, and
seafood. This was the original, classic habanero sauce that has been
imitated in commercial products countless times.
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