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Cooking Method - Sauté
If you can’t find ramps, substitute scallions with a few cloves of garlic. Of course, you can adjust the heat level by increasing or reducing the amount of chile powder added to the soup. Serve with crusty French bread.
This sauce, similar to that served at the world­renowned Antoine's restaurant in the French Quarter of New Orleans, represents the essence of Creole cookery. It is wonderful when served over chicken, shrimp, or rice dishes.
These Vietnamese rolls resemble Chinese egg rolls, but use rice paper instead of won ton wrappers, which produces a much more delicate product. Handling rice paper for the wrapping is easy if you use only a couple of sheets at a time and keep the rest covered with a damp towel to keep them moist. These rolls can be prepared in advance: reheat in a 350 degree oven until crisp, about 20 minutes.
These beans are an excellent accompaniment to a tropical barbecue. There are many variations of preparing turtle, or black beans, throughout the Caribbean. This recipe uses a Cuban sofrito, which is sauted onions, tomatoes pepper garlic and herbs, as a flavor base for the dishes. Remember to always add and salt or an acid after the beans are done, adding them sooner will make the beans tough.
This recipe is from Tanzania, East Africa.  Even though soups and stews are common throughout Africa, this recipe shows the Indian influence with the addition of curry.


 
Dal is the Hindi word for several of the legumes or beans that resemble lentils or split peas. In India they can be found both fresh and dried, but here we almost always find them dried. The bean used in this curry is called "toovar dal" and resembles a yellow split pea. Pulses or dried lentils are sometimes hard to digest. So cooks in India where they are staples, say to prepare them with ginger or turmeric to make them more digestible. This recipe contains both.

This recipe is extremely hot and very typical of Sonora, where people make salsa casera with 2 to 3 cups of chiltepins! Serve this with a mild fish or poultry entree. Feel free to reduce the amount of chiltepins, or to substitute 3 tablespoons chipotle powder for a milder, smokier flavor..
Chef Chris Fernandez, originally from Mexico, is now the Master Chef of Red Mesa Restaurant in St. Petersburg. This recipe reflects his "Nuevo Latino with a Mexican Twist" style. He specializes in using nouveau techniques to combine traditional Mexican recipes with Latin flavors.

I’m winging it here, as Doug Gibson, of course, had no written recipe. I watched carefully but am guesstimating the ingredient amounts. But what the hell, he was cooking on the beach! The conch does not burn, it just turns quite dark because of the seasoning.

Red Stripe beer is the magical ingredient in this ship-shape dish from St. Vincent. Make sure you buy extra beer for the cook; that way, you may get to have the big piece of lobster during dinner!
 

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