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Cooking Method - Sauté
Chef Jim Heywood teaches at the Culinary Institute of America, and is a Fiery Foods Show favorite. He always offers a lot of cooking tips and information, as well as incredible food!

This recipe and others can be found in the following article:

Where Africa Meets India: Fiery Durban Curry

By Diana Armstrong 

 

Durban Curry 

Similar to empanadas, traditional samosas are conical shaped filled pastries that are a popular snack throughout the sub-continent. Although they are typically fried, I prefer the filling in a baked empanada pastry. Potatoes and peas are common ingredients in samosas and I like to add a little yogurt so the mixture isn’t too dry.
The area of Madras has one of the hottest cuisines in India, which is known for spicy food. In fact it is one of the biggest exporters of Indian spices. This very simple dish is a favorite there in the south where the use of coconut milk in curries is popular. The sweetness of the milk compliments the pungency of their curries. Egg curry is served at any time and is a great spicy addition to brunch or for a light supper. Serve Mottai Kolambu with white rice and an Indian relish or salad.
The concept of marinating chicken in a spicy fruit juice and then char-broiling originated in Mexico and is becoming quite popular throughout the Southwest. The chicken is served with warm corn tortillas, fresh salsa, and a side of pinto beans. Customers then remove the chicken from the bones, place it in the tortilla, top with salsa, and enjoy. Note: This recipe requires advance preparation.
The most famous chile in France is piment d’ Espelette, or the Espelette 
pepper, and it has become a cultural and culinary icon in the French
part of Basque country. At first the Espelette farmers formed
cooperative enterprises to protect their interests, and eventually they
applied to the National Institute for Trade Name Origins for an
Appellation d’Origine Controlee (AOC). On December 1, 1999, an AOC was
granted to Espelette peppers and products, giving it the same protection
as more famous names, such as Champagne sparkling wine. Only ten
villages are allowed to use the name “Espelette”: Espelette, Ainhoa,
Cambo les Bains, Halsou, Itsassou, Jatsou, Laressore, St. Pee sur
Nivelle, Souraide, and Ustarritz. The total growing area is about 3,000
acres. Piperade is a colorful pepper sauce that is only spicy when made
in the Basque region. This simple but delicious sauce is often served at
the Celebration of the Peppers in the village of Espelette. Serve it
over boiled potatoes and green beans.
This is the green chile counterpart to Ethiopian Berbere, but there are some differences.  It's green, it's much milder, and instead of placing it in stews, it's a condiment or dip for breads and meats.
Here is another popular fritter from West Africa with two sources of chile heat.  Serve them with a dip
This is a common dish in the cocinas económicas of Isla Mujeres, though Leonore’s version is anything but that. It is best served as she does, with rice, black beans, marinated onions, hot sauce and fresh hot tortillas.
The blending of eggplant (often called garden eggs) and fish creates a unique taste treat from Ghana.  The extra taste addition comes from shrimp.  Because the eggplant is salted to remove excess moisture, go easy on any additional salt when cooking this dish.
 

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