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Chile - Scotch Bonnet

This is an island coleslaw with a bonney pepper kick, another one of the spectacular dishes served up by Anne Marie on our picnic. She says that it tastes best (of course) when made with her brand of hot sauce, Tropical Inferno. Warning: this is not a low fat recipe.

Note: This recipe requires advance preparation.

This versiion of the famous island seasoning is from Ann Marie Whittaker, who noted: "This is found in almost every home and is the secret to the success for many mouth-watering Bajan dishes." One of the favorite uses is to place it between the meat and skin of chicken pieces before grilling, baking, or frying.

Note: This recipe requires advance preparation.

I was served what the Anguillans call crayfish, but they’re considerably larger than the Louisiana kind yet smaller than a spiny lobster. Don’t ask me their scientific name. Substitute large lobster tails for them if they don’t live in your neighborhood. The wet rub or marinate is from Dale Carty at Tasty’s and it’s quite unique. The yield is about 1 cup.

'Rotis are traditional fare throughout the Caribbean and have been called a West Indian version of a burrito. The bread wrapper is East Indian in origin and always contains something curried. '
In Jamaica, they call pimento allspice. You can find allspice berries in the spice section of your grocery store, but they are often less expensive bought in bulk at a natural foods store. If you can't find goat meat you can substitute lamb or mutton.
In tiny Bathsheba on the wild Atlantic coast, Enid Worrell creates some of the best Bajan cuisine at her establishment, the Bonito Bar and Restaurant. She was kind enough to give us her recipe for corned--or pickled--bonney peppers. The vinegar acquires the heat of the peppers, and then it’s sprinkled over fish or curries. The pickled peppers are chopped up and used when fresh ones are not available. Note: This recipe requires advance preparation.
Also called escabeche, this tart, hot and spicy marinade for fish is an integral part of Jamaican and Puerto Rican foods. In Jamaica it is made with consists of pimientos (allspice), black pepper, onions, garlic, vinegar and Scotch bonnet peppers. Although in Jamaica this dish is made with saltwater fish, use whatever individual-sized fish you can find, like trout.
If you can't find it bottled, make this sauce just before serving. You can control the heat level by adding more or fewer peppers.
Gorgeous insists that his sauce is secret, but if he wanted to keep it that way, he should never have told me the ingredients. We experimented in Dave’s and Mary Jane’s kitchen until we got the sauce right. It can also be used on chicken. It is a grill sauce, designed to be brushed on during the grilling process, but it has a lot of sugar in it, so take care that it does not burn. The sauce yield is about 1 cup.

This recipe was developed by chef Ed Arace of Panama Red's Beach Bar and Seafood Grille in Nashville, Tennessee, who comments: "I couldn't cook without peppers or hot sauce--even in my delicate dishes a little dash of sauce or a small amount of peppers will enhance it without overpowering it." This poultry dish, however, is not delicate but rather robust.

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