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Chile - Scotch Bonnet
For this recipe, use a good quality imported curry powder; the domestic curry powders just don't have the taste or the punch needed for this recipe. Serve this dish with rice and peas or fried plantains or cooked yams.
The ingredients for this sauce were given to me by Dale Carty and I must say that I admired him for making his sauce from scratch rather than buying a commercial one. That’s probably why his restaurant is named as it is. This sauce is added to the chicken during the last half of cooking, and the chicken is best when it’s smoke-grilled (used wood chips soaked in water), so keep it quite a distance from the fire, close the lid on the barbecue unit, and grill it slowly. The sauce yield is about 3 cups or a little more.

Chris Schlesinger, of the East Coast Grill in Cambridge, Massachusetts, sent us this recipe, which was published in an early issue of Chile Pepper magazine. The sharp spiciness of the chile combines easily with mellow sweetness of the mango to create a strong by not overpowering accompaniment for the creamy taste of the scallops. From the article Mango Madness!

Here is a classic Jamaican dish that is much beloved in that country. As usual, lamb may be substituted for the goat. Note the West Indian trait of using a massala without chile powder, and then adding chiles to the curry. The dish is traditionally served with white rice, mango chutney, and grated coconut.

Goat is a popular island meat for jerking. Its stronger flavor works well with the rich seasonings of the jerk rub. Read more about Jamaica's Jerk cuisine in the article "Cookin' Jerk on de Barbacoa, Mon!" By Rick Browne


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A Recipe From:

America's Best BBQ:

100 Recipes from America's Best Smokehouses, Pits, Shacks, Rib Joints, Roadhouses, and Restaurants

 

by Ardie A. Davis and Chef Paul Kirk


This recipe and other can be found in the Book Excerpt: America's Best BBQ

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The "jerk" in jerk pork is a spice mixture that was used to preserve meat before refrigeration. It was developed by the Awarak Indians, and later refined in Jamaica by runaway slaves known as Maroons. These days, the spices are used to season meats for barbecue and to tenderize rather than to preserve. An inexpensive smoker or a covered grill can be substituted for the traditional jerk pit, and is a lot easier than digging a pit in your yard. Note: This recipe required advance preparation.

Note the presence of allspice in this Jamaican version of the pika condiment. Serve over any grilled or roasted meat, fish, or poultry.
Note the presence of allspice in this Jamaican version of the pika condiment. Serve over any grilled or roasted meat, fish or poultry.

This recipe for jerk sauce is fiery but not incendiary, full of flavor, and worth the effort to make it. There are as many Jamaican recipes for jerk as there are Jamaicans; I settled on this as one the best of the best. Serve with big iced bottles of Jamaican Red Stripe beer. Read more about Jamaica's Jerk cuisine in the article"Cookin' Jerk on de Barbacoa, Mon!" By Rick Browne

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