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Ingredient - Seafood

The key to preparing salmon this way is to make certain that your smoke is rather cool, about 100 degrees. If it is warmer, decrease the smoking time. This recipe takes a fair amount of time, but most of that is spent waiting rather than working. The selection of sauces served is up to the cook, so feel free to experiment. A horseradish sauce will work also. The salmon can also be served on bagels, as pictured here. Note: This recipe requires advance preparation.

This recipe and others can be found in the following article:

Borneo's Forest Food

Article and Location Photos by Victor Paul Borg

 

Chef Chris Fernandez, originally from Mexico, is now the Master Chef of Red Mesa Restaurant in St. Petersburg. This recipe reflects his "Nuevo Latino with a Mexican Twist" style. He specializes in using nouveau techniques to combine traditional Mexican recipes with Latin flavors.

I’m winging it here, as Doug Gibson, of course, had no written recipe. I watched carefully but am guesstimating the ingredient amounts. But what the hell, he was cooking on the beach! The conch does not burn, it just turns quite dark because of the seasoning.

Red Stripe beer is the magical ingredient in this ship-shape dish from St. Vincent. Make sure you buy extra beer for the cook; that way, you may get to have the big piece of lobster during dinner!

This recipe creates a dry cure rub for fish; use instead of brining in preparation for smoking. Read more about smoked fish in Mike Stines' article here.

Use only fresh fish that has been kept clean and cold. Salmon are split with the backbone removed or filleted; bottom fish filleted; herring and smelts are headed and gutted. (Herring are also traditionally split for kippers.) Rinse the fish with running cold water to remove all traces of blood.

This is a quick to prepare and unusual seviche. In Ecuador it’s served with cancha, which is a toasted corn but, since it’s not readily available, the popcorn is an American substitution. This seviche is a quick one because you use precooked, frozen, small shrimp. If the popcorn is a bit " out there" for you, there are a number of other garnishes that are also popular. Garnish with black olives, sliced hard-boiled egg, feta cheese, or a slice of corn on the cob.

Also called escabeche, this tart, hot and spicy marinade for fish is an integral part of Jamaican and Puerto Rican foods. In Jamaica it is made with consists of pimientos (allspice), black pepper, onions, garlic, vinegar and Scotch bonnet peppers. Although in Jamaica this dish is made with saltwater fish, use whatever individual-sized fish you can find, like trout.

Fish is such a common and cheap food in West Africa, it's no wonder that there are numerous recipes for spicy fish cakes such as these.  Try them served hot with a spicy dipping sauce.

 

A gumbo is a Cajun soup that has a roux as a base and uses file (sassafras leaves) and/or okra as a thickening agent. This dish probably has African origins, as the Bantu word for okra is gumbo! Often served as a main dish, this "soup" may contain chicken, meat, or ham in addition to vegetables, tomatoes, and spices. Serve with potato salad, sourdough bread and blackbottom pie for dessert. Note: Gumbo can be prepared ahead of time. Prepare the gumbo up to the point to where the fish is added. Refrigerate until ready to heat and serve.
 

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