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Meal/Course - Side Dish

This Colman’s recipe makes a sweet heat side dish that goes well with roasted meats. Feel free to add more mustard to really spice it up.

This vegetarian consommé can be substituted for vegetable stock in any recipe. The flavor of peppers dominates this powerful, spiced up broth. It is an elegant example of a first course soup that can precede any entree. Read Dave DeWitt's entire spicy spring soup article here.

The credit for this recipe goes to Big Daddy, whoever he is. Feel free to spice this up by adding a couple of teaspoons of minced serrano or jalapeño chiles.
Tamales can be filled with almost anything from meat or poultry to fruits and nuts. To create variations on this traditional recipe, simply replace the pork with the ingredients of choice. Tamales are traditionally served covered with red or green chile sauce–but use both for red and green "Christmas" tamales.

This is a style of smoking that hails from China’s Sichuan (formerly Szechuan) region, which is known for its hot, spicy cuisine.  This is the recipe Mark Masker used to make this tasty Asian bacon.  Read the entire article on the Burn! Blog here.

Tempeh, made from fermented soybeans, is an Indonesian specialty. Its firm, nutty texture makes for good grilling in these satays. Serve on white rice with the sauce on the side, a cucumber and vinegar salad, and hot sauteed green beans.

The Texas Jersey Cheese Company, near LaGrange, Texas, makes 750 pounds of cheese a week. The star is a pepper Jack cheese (using large chunks of jalapeño chiles), and this is one of their star chile cheeserecipes.

This unusual combination of ingredients makes a salad that is hearty enough to be served as an entree as well as a side dish. I always prepare this salad a day before I plan to serve it to ensure the flavors are combined. A word of caution though, the salad seems to increase in heat the longer it sits. So make the dressing a little on the mild side or the salad may become too hot to enjoy.

This recipe appears in the article "Sidekicks: Three Fun Barbecue Side Dishes from Mike
Stines" on the Burn! Blog. Read the story here.

 

This recipe and others can be found in the following article:

Mascarene Chile Cuisine

 

By Dave DeWitt

 

 

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