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Cooking Method - Smoke

This recipe combines a marinade, an injected marinade, and a stovetop smoker to create smoked pork chops that equal what comes out of the offset smoker in warmer months. Leave the cover slightly open until a light smoke develops (about 10 minutes or so) then slide the cover completely closed and smoke the chops for 30 minutes while preheating the oven to 400 degrees F.  Serve with garlic mashed potatoes and sautéed green beans.  Note: This recipe requires advance preparation.

There's nothing quite like prime rib, especially slow-roasted and lightly smoked with apple wood and mesquite to add another layer of flavor. This recipe combines a dry rub for the meat and pan drippings that makes a great au jus.  If you like, the roast could be dry-aged in the refrigerator to enhance the flavor and tenderness even more. Age the beef for up to a week by placing it, uncovered, on a wire rack over a drip pan in the refrigerator. When ready to prepare the roast, trim off any dried pieces and rinse the roast under cold water. Take into account that the roast will lose 10 to 15 percent of its weight during aging, so purchase a larger roast than usual.

The roast should have a moderately thick layer of white fat over the meat. Trim off the fat cap to about 1/4-inch thickness, but don't trim all the fat. That's what imparts a marvelous flavor to the meat and helps retain moisture as it cooks. Have your butcher cut the bones from the roast and re-attach them for easier carving. Serve with horseradish cream sauce, pan drippings, sautéed green beans with caraway and twice-baked potato.  Note: This recipe requires advance preparation.

A Recipe From:

300 Big & Bold Barbecue & Grilling Recipes

 

by Karen Adler and Judith Fertig

 

This recipe and others can be found in the Book Excerpt: 300 Big & Bold Barbecue & Grilling Recipes.

recipe image

This is a style of smoking that hails from China’s Sichuan (formerly Szechuan) region, which is known for its hot, spicy cuisine. Serious Chinese food geeks may be familiar with Zhangcha duck—a tea-smoked Sichuan delicacy that’s tough to make but impressive as hell to anyone who’s never had it before. This is the recipe Mark Masker used for his rib experiment.  Read the entire article on the Burn! Blog here.

This is a style of smoking that hails from China’s Sichuan (formerly Szechuan) region, which is known for its hot, spicy cuisine.  This is the recipe Mark Masker used to make this tasty Asian bacon.  Read the entire article on the Burn! Blog here.

This is a much easier version of the famous smoked duck which involves marinating, steaming, drying, and smoking. You can make this in a stove-top smoker. The tea colors the skin an appealing color, and any loose tea will work, even the Orange Pekoe in most tea bags. If using chicken pieces, cut the marinade recipe in half. Serve with fresh spring rolls, pickled radish and carrot relish, and Sichuan noodles with vegetables. Note that this recipe requires advance preparation.

Okay, okay, we borrowed a Texas technique and changed the rub to reflect our chilehead tastes. For years we have been perfecting recipes using a smoker known as an Oklahoma Joe’s. It is a horizontal, cylindrical smoker about three and a half feet long and about fourteen inches in diameter. It has an attached, dropped fire box that allows smoking with fairly cool smoke because the fire is separated a bit from the smoking area. Because smoking is so time consuming, it makes sense to smoke several things at once. In addition to brisket, we also smoke a turkey breast. Some cooks use the basting sauce as a mop during the smoking process and eliminate the long marinade at the end of smoking. Leftovers, if there are any, make the best barbecue sandwiches when served on a crusty hard roll with your choice of sauce from chapter 3.

For as simple as this rub is, it goes great with red meat, especially tri-tip.

This is a style of smoking that hails from China’s Sichuan (formerly Szechuan) region, which is known for its hot, spicy cuisine. Serious Chinese food geeks may be familiar with Zhangcha duck—a tea-smoked Sichuan delicacy that’s tough to make but impressive as hell to anyone who’s never had it before. This is the recipe Mark Masker used for his experiment.  Read the entire article on the Burn! Blog here.

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