• The Fiery Foods and Barbecue Supersite
  • Recipe of the Day
  • All About Chiles
  • BBQ, Grilling & Smoking
  • Burn Blog
  • Videos
  • PodCast
  • Fiery Foods & BBQ Show
  • Scovie Awards
 Login / Logout

Keyword >
Cooking
Method >
Meal /
Course >
Ingredient >
Cuisine >
Heat Level >
Chile >






Cuisine - Spanish
This is the classic Spanish sausage which was later transplanted to Mexico and flavored with different chiles. Traditionally, the links are air-dried in a cool place before being refrigerated. For a great breakfast treat, remove the sausage from the casings, crumble and fry it in a pan. Add eggs that have been whisked and scramble them with the sausage. Serve with a chile sauce made from pimentón. You will need a sausage stuffer attachment for your grinder for this recipe. In some versions of this recipe, other seasonings, such as cinnamon and coriander, are added.
This traditional tapa is not anything like a Mexican tortilla. A Spanish tortilla is a large, thick, omelet-like cake made with potatoes and eggs and is served at room temperature. Romesco sauce is an all-purpose Spanish sauce that is served with a wide variety of dishes. From the Tarragona region, this Catalan sauce combines two of the most popular horticultural imports from the New World---chiles and tomatoes. The sauce gets its name from the romesco chiles that are used but are not readily available outside of Spain. The combination of ancho and New Mexican chiles approximates the taste.

This is a classic Spanish tapa with variations in every region and no tapas bar would be complete without garlic shrimp. Shrimp are abundant off the coast of Spain and soaking them in salt water before cooking gives them a fresh, briny flavor, that is reminiscent of being just caught. Serve this tapa with lots of crusty bread to soak up the sauce.

Richard Sterling developed this recipe, which is his version of how the Spaniards transformed Montezuma’s favorite beverage, with the addition of alcohol. He commented: "Salud! Drink to the Old World and the New."
My friend Richard Sterling developed this recipe, which is his version 
of how the Spaniards transformed Montezuma’s favorite spicy beverage
with the addition of alcohol. He commented: "Salud! Drink to the Old
World and the New."
Here is a tasty option for cooking shark, or, for that matter, any firm fish that is big enough to have steaks cut from it, such as swordfish. We prefer to grill over hardwood rather than charcoal briquets, and two of the best woods to use are pecan and hickory. Mesquite can be substituted, but it imparts a strong flavor to the fish. Dave collected this recipe in Trinidad, where a dish called Shark and Bake is a specialty. Serve with conch chowder, curried cauliflower, potatoes, peas, and a fruit chutney.
«StartPrev123NextEnd»
 

Featured Rapid Recipe



Copyright© 1997-2014, Sunbelt Shows, Inc.
No portion of this site may be reproduced in any medium
without the written permission of the copyright holder.