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Cooking Method - Stir-Fry
Note: This recipe requires advance preparation
Hot and slightly sweet describes this recipe.  Serve it with plain white rice. Eating the red chile pod pieces is not recommended.

I like the way the cooks at Ruen Pair prepare their Khii Mao or "drunkard’s noodles." It is less elaborate than some, but I prefer its simplicity. This is a typical bar food dish in Thailand, intended to be washed down with buckets of Singha beer. Don’t be afraid to make it as spicy as you can stand—it will certainly be true to the original. Stir-frying noodles isn’t hard, but it does require a lot of oil. To minimize the amount of oil used, add a little at a time as you cook the noodles.

Asparagus is a nutritional gem. It has only 22 calories per half cup or approximately six spears and contains vitamins A and C plus 2 grams of fiber.

This wonderful curry is from the Mighty Spice cookbook by John Gregory-Smith, available on Amazon.com here. Read a full review of his book on the Burn! Blog here.

This recipe is courtesy of the Marriott Phuket Resort and Spa. Serve it with rice and Green Papaya Salad, above.

This recipe and others can be found in the following article:

Bugged Out in Thailand!

By Paul Ross

Developed by Tara Zuluaga, the Home Shore’s kayak charter chef, this recipe graces Alaska salmon, soba noodles, and sautéed vegetables with a creamy ginger-garlic sauce. Although this version of the recipe calls for grilled salmon, baking the fish also produces excellent results.

Whether you call it Chap Chee, Chap Chae, or Jap Chae (a combination of Japan and China),

this is a very popular dish that combines a variety of textures, colors, flavors, simple seasonings along with one of their staples, noodles. Koreans love beef and serve it more often that pork and chicken, and they never eat lamb or goat. Garlic, ginger, and sesame are common to most Korean beef dishes and this one is no exception. Traditionally, Chap Chee is spiced up with a bowl of kimchi. Available in Asian markets, it’s a fiery hot condiment containing fermented vegetables such as cabbage and turnips. An acquired taste! The meat will be easier to thinly slice if put in the freezer for about 30 minutes and have all the ingredients assembled before stir-frying.

This classic Sichuan stir-fry dish can be made with shrimp, pork, beef, or even tofu as well as chicken.  It’s a simple dish with just a few ingredients combined with crunchy peanuts for texture. The complex flavors come from the marinating and seasoning sauces.

 

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