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Ingredient - Vegetable
Corn tortillas need to be heated so that you can roll them without cracking and splitting. The traditional method for softening involves dipping the tortillas in hot oil, however, the same result can be achieved by lightly moistening the tortillas with water, wrapping them in foil, and placing them in a 350 degree oven for 10 minutes. You can also wrap the tortillas in a cloth towel and microwave them on high for 1 to 2 minutes.
Here are a few recommendations to make this salad as tasty as possible: first, buy good white wine vinegar; second, make sure you use Italian parsley for its spark, and, if you can't find it, grow it or substitute watercress with its peppery overtones; and third, be prepared to run out of salad--it really is that good.

This stock is good enough to serve as a first course consommé, in addition to using it as a basis for some of the recipes that follow. Baking or caramelizing the vegetables before adding the water gives an additional richness to the stock. If you wish, adding a 1 to 2 inch piece of kombu seaweed will also add a further depth of flavor. This stock will keep for 2 days, covered, in the refrigerator. It can also be frozen; divide it into 2- or 3-cup freezer containers. Feel free to add any vegetable trimmings from the bag in your freezer, but beware of cabbage or broccoli, whose flavors tend to dominate the stock.

Read Dave DeWitt's article on Veggie Soups for Spring here.

If ever there were a macho potato salad, this is it! Grilled cactus and chopped jicima add an unexpected twist to this warm, spicy red potato salad. To complete the Southwestern theme, these ingredients are tossed in a dressing of freshly squeezed lime juice and adobo sauce mixed with a heavy dose of chopped cilantro. Though the cactus adds a unique flavor to this salad, if it is not available at your local grocery store, it can be omitted.

In 1969, our Canadian neighbors in Calgary invented the Caesar Cocktail to celebrate a new restaurant. The drink now consistently ranks in the top ten favorites. With the addition of wasabi, this recipe takes the Bloody Caesar to where no drink has gone before.

This is one of the more unusual vegetarian African appetizers.  Note the combination of bananas, chiles, and ginger which make for a sweet and spicy taste.

Egyptians call any dish of raw vegetables a "salad"even though we would call this a dip or spread.
Sharon Hudgins discovered this recipe when she was living in the Russian Far East, where it was made with large white Japanese daikon radishes. The same recipe would be made in European Russia with the large, bulbous white radishes that grow there.

Every year on the Saturday preceding the Super Bowl, Wild Oats Market in Albuquerque sponsors the Chef’s Invitational Souper Bowl Soup Contest. In 1995, W.C. defeated a dozen of other Albuquerque chefs with this grand prize winner. Use whatever wild mushrooms you have to make 9 ounces—we have suggested a mixture, below. W.C. gathered most of the musrooms from the Sandia Mountains near Albuquerque and urges aficionados to learn about wild mushrooms.

This recipe and others can be found in the following article:

Borneo's Forest Food

Article and Location Photos by Victor Paul Borg

 

 

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