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Ingredient - Vegetable
From chef Jaymz Pool comes this beautiful, North African-inspired soup in the recipe booklet supplied by the Hortus Botanicus. Serve with a crusty French bread.
Many chili cooks like to adjust the heat in their chili by adding various kinds of hot sauces. For the purists in the crowd who insist on making everything from scratch, here is our recipe for a homemade hot sauce. Any chiles of choice can be used. When substituting dry chiles for fresh ones, soak them in warm water for ½ hour to reconstitute them. For more body in this sauce, add the carrots. You can easily double or triple this recipe.

The "horn" in this salad is actually a roasted poblano chile. The stuffing is a zesty mixture that is both rich and refreshing, with a contrast of textures. Serve it with a Mexican meal. From the article Exotic & Spicy Salads.

This recipe appears in the article "Sidekicks: Three Fun Barbecue Side Dishes from Mike
Stines" on the Burn! Blog. Read the story here.

For this recipe, you could use fresh beets and prepared horseradish, but by making your own horseradish you can control the heat level. Canned beets make this a breeze to prepare.

Even people who don’t like artichokes will like this dish. Although it tastes like it requires a lot of preparation, it is very easy to make. It takes no time to put together and can be made in advance and refrigerated to save time before a party. Then it just needs to be brought to room temperature before baking. Serve with the pita triangles or substitute crisp tortilla or corn chips; they all taste good with this dip. To increase the heat, sprinkle minced jalapeño or serrano chiles on top.

Mango and habanero offer a tantalizing salad combination. As always, be judicious with your use of the world's hottest chile -- remember you can always add more, but it's hard to take away the heat if you add too much.

Emil O. Topel, Executive Chef of Fancy's Restaurant, was raised in England, received his culinary training in France, and produces his own line of condiments. Here he presents a wonderful, spicy soup that is a great starter, or a wonderful light lunch.
This is a very traditional condiment all over Mexico and the Southwest. The canned versions of these jalapeños are more commonly served, but these are much tastier. Note: This recipe requires advance preparation.

Sunomono is a Japanese salad made with sliced cucumbers in a tangy dressing; you may have seen it on the menu at your favorite sushi restaurant. If you dice the cucumbers, sunomono becomes a salsa that makes a lively accompaniment to fresh oysters, seared tuna steaks, or fried soft-shell crabs. Feel free to experiment with this simple recipe, adding shreds of dried seaweed or toasted sesame seeds.

Edyth James of Saffron's Restaurant grew up in Jamaica, and here she treats us to a traditional recipe from the Caribbean. This jerk sauce can be used as a marinade, dressing or sauce on many different dishes. Try experimenting with different meats. You can also use this jerk sauce as a marinade for chicken to be cooked on an open grill.
 

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