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Exploring the World of Spice and Smoke
Tags >> recipe

Scared Straight Turkey Tamales

Posted by: Lois Manno

Tagged in: recipe , new content , humor , history , fiery foods

 

Listen up, little dogs. All of you spoiled little chihuahuas, toy poodles, and terriers have had it too good for too long. Sitting at the screen door, barking at everyone, day in, day out, it's a poor choice for a life path. You're so lucky you don't have it like your ancestors did. Four hundred years ago, Mesoamerican people kept you little yappers to complement cooked veggies instead of handbags. Read more on the Burn! Blog here.


Presto, It's Pesto!

Posted by: Dave DeWitt

Tagged in: recipe , gardening , fiery foods

Greek Minature BasilOne of my favorite summer things is fresh pesto—spiced up, of course.  And one of the main ingredients is basil, although cooks substitute spinach, Italian parsley, and cilantro for the basil on occasion.  There are more than 60 species and varieties of basil, and one of my favorites is 'Greek Miniature Basil' at left.  I shot this photo in a greenhouse full of Italian chile pepper varieties in Torre del Lago Puccini on the northwest coast of Italy last year.

Dana Bowen, writing in Saveur, noted:  “From its humble beginnings in Liguria, pesto has gone far: not only can you find it in jarred form all around the world, but it's used to flavor everything from pizzas to fast-food sandwiches to chips. It's now a household name, up there with marinara and mayonnaise. But unlike those sauces, pesto has always conferred a certain gourmet status in the States; its rise in popularity in the 1980s coincided with the period when Americans started exploring regional Italian cooking and embracing all things Mediterranean.”

Saveur's online pesto articles are here and their pesto recipes are here.

Here are two spicy pestos for you to try!

Green Chile Pesto

Of course we have our own New Mexican version of pesto! It’s a topping for pasta but also can be added to soups, stews, and rice. Although we have specified cilantro in this recipes, you can use the traditional basil or even Italian parsley. Pecans, another New Mexican crop, can be substituted for the piñon nuts.

1 cup chopped green New Mexican chile
1 cup chopped fresh cilantro
1/3 cup piñon nuts
1/2 cup grated Parmesan or Pecorino Romano cheese
1/2 cup virgin olive oil

Place the chile, cilantro, nuts, and cheese in a food processor and, while processing, slowly drizzle in the oil to form a pesto.
Yield: 1 1/2 cups
Heat Scale: Medium

Chipotle Pesto
Chipotle Pesto

From our friend J.P. Hayes of Sgt. Pepper's Hot Sauce Micro Brewery in Austin comes this excellent pesto designed to be served over homemade bread, pasta or use as a pizza topping. Mix it with mayonnaise or ranch dressing and it's a tasty dip. J.P. gave a dramatic demonstration of preparing this pesto without electricity at the 1996 Texas Hill Country Wine and Food Festival.

1 can chipotle chiles in adobo (or 1/2 cup chipotles rehydrated in wine vinegar)
1/4 cup tomato paste
8 cloves garlic
2 tablespoons cider vinegar or lime juice
1 cup grated Parmesan or romano cheese
1 cup pumpkin seeds (pepitas) or piñon nuts, toasted
1 cup canola oil

Combine the chipotles, garlic, and vinegar in a food processor and puree. Add the cheese and pumpkin seeds. With the processor running, drizzle in the oil until the desired consistency is reached (you may not need all the oil).
Yield: 1 1/2 cups
Heat Scale: Medium hot


Pungent Pizza on the Grill

Posted by: Dave DeWitt

Tagged in: recipe , grilling , fiery foods , chile peppers

 

Pungent Pizza on the GrillDon't want to heat up the kitchen? Tired of bland commercial pizza? Heard enough about Godfather's Pizza to last a lifetime?  Try this spiced up Southwestern pizza cooked on your grill! 

Pungent Pizza on the Grill

In this recipe we attempt to recreate the wonderful thin-crust pizza from wood-fired ovens in your very own backyard. Our homemade crust has something that Pizza Doodle Express does not: chile. But if you’re lazy and don’t want to make your own dough, you can use a 12-inch, pre-baked pizza shell. You can also easily make the dough in your bread machine. It is very important to have a clean grill for this recipes, as any residue on the grill will give the crust an off flavor. Why not make both toppings and divide the pizza?

You can read another article about grilled pizza by Mark Masker on the Burn! Blog. In it he celebrates National Pizza Day—February 9.

The Chile Dough
1 cup warm water (100 degrees F.)
2 tablespoons olive oil
1 ½ cups all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon sugar
1 teaspoon yeast
3/4 teaspoon salt
2 teaspoons crushed red chile
Freshly ground black pepper

Yield: 1 12-inch pizza

Powerful Puttanesca Topping
3 cups chopped fresh tomatoes, such as cherry or roma
2 tablespoons chopped capers
2 tablespoons chopped nicoise olives
1 tablespoon chopped fresh basil
2 teaspoons crushed red chile
Garlic salt
1 cup grated parmigiano reggiano or pecorino romano cheese
Olive oil

Southwest Green Chile Topping
8 New Mexican green chiles, roasted, peeled and cut in half lengthwise
1 cup grated mozzarella cheese
½ cup grated provolone cheese

To make the pizza by hand, combine the water and sugar in a bowl and stir in the yeast. Let stand for 10 minutes until foamy.

In a large bowl, combine the flour, salt, chile and pepper. Make a well in the flour and pour in the yeast water and olive oil. Stir until almost mixed, turn onto a floured board and knead until the dough is smooth and elastic.

Place the dough in a lightly oiled bowl and cover with plastic wrap. Place in a warm, draft free location and let rise until doubled, about an hour and a half.
Punch down the dough and divide into 2 balls. If preparing ahead of time, place in the refrigerator until ready to use. Bring the dough back to room temperature and then proceed with the recipe.

Roll out each portion into a round or oval pizza or do it free-form. If it will fit on your grill, you can also combine the balls into one and make one large pizza.
Heat a gas grill to hot. If using charcoal bank the coals to one side, creating a hot side and a warm side.

Brush each of the pizzas with olive oil and gently drape, oil side down on a hot grill. Shortly, within a minute or two, the dough will start to rise and bubbles will appear. Gently lift an end to see that the underside is browned and has grill marks. Immediately invert the crust onto a pan, and turn the gas grill to low
Brush the dough with additional oil.

To make the puttanesca, place the tomatoes on the cooked side of the pizza, sprinkle the capers, olives, pepper and cheese over the top. Shake a little garlic over the pizza and sprinkle some olive oil over the top.

To make the Southwestern topping, lay the green chile strips over the cooked side. Top with the cheese and sprinkling of the olive oil. Slide the pizza(s) back onto the grill. Cover and cook, rotating once or twice until the toppings are heated through and the crust is browned, about 5 minutes on the cooler part of the grill.

Yield: 1 12-inch pizza or 2 small individual pizzas
Heat Scale: Mild to medium



Q: What's a good use for horseradish besides cocktail sauce or as a side with roast beef? And what makes it so hot?

A: Horseradish is a root, similar to wasabi, and a member of the mustard family. Prepared horseradish is grated horseradish root combined with distilled vinegar. It has almost no taste until grated when the cells are crushed to release a volatile oil that produces the “heat.”

Read more about the uses of horseradish and get some great recipes for making your own on the Burn! Blog.


 

As three-year-olds go, the Disc-It Round Up is pretty developed and well-behaved. It’s an event the folks at Disc-It started in 2009 as their way of giving back to New Mexico's UNM Children’s Hospital for all the care that Disc-It front man Nevin Montano’s daughter and nephew received in the past. Round Up year one saw 350 attendees; that number ballooned to 2500 people for 2010. This time, an estimated 5000-7000 people showed up at the Hard Rock Casino Albuquerque on July 16th looking to sample a wide range of Disc-It grilled creations.


Find out who won and check out some killer recipes from the Round Up on the Burn! Blog here.


Cool Down on the Fourth with A Firecracker

Posted by: Lois Manno

Tagged in: recipe , new content , holidays , beverages , alcohol

 

Riazul FirecrackerThis drink looks too good to be legal...but it is, proving that epic July 4th fireworks can be served up in a glass as well as in the sky. Wow your Fourth of July barbecue guests with the Riazul Firecracker. This spicy cocktail, infused with Riazul Premium Silver, was concocted by Jorge Guzman, master mixologist and owner of Ofrenda, the new cantina-themed hot spot in Manhattan's West Village. Check out the recipe on the Burn! Blog here.

 

 


Ambergris Caye, Belize This particular “burger” is a fired-up re-creation of a fish sandwich one of our editors devoured in the tiny town of San Pedro on Ambergris Caye, Belize. The restaurant was called Elvies Burger Isle, and the diners sat outside under a tamarind tree on picnic benches. If ever there was a simple to prepare, quick and easy fish recipe with significant heat, this is it. Serve with Curried Pineapple Serrano Salsa, french fries, crispy cole slaw, and to toast Elvie, a frosty tamarind cooler.

Belizean Rubbed and Grilled Fish Burger

1 teaspoon ground habanero chile
1 teaspoon garlic salt
1 teaspoon ground thyme
½ teaspoon ground allspice
1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg
1 tablespoon olive oil
4 small white fish fillets, such as snapper, trigger fish, or grouper
4 rolls

Curried Pineapple Serrano Salsa

1 ripe pineapple, peeled, cored, and cut in 1/4-inch slices
3 serrano chiles, stems removed, chopped
2 tablespoons rice wine vinegar
1 tablespoon orange juice
2 teaspoons curry powder
2 teaspoons brown sugar
1 tablespoon chopped fresh cilantro


In a bowl, combine the chile, salt, garlic, thyme, allspice and nutmeg. Brush the fillets with the oil and dust with the spice mixture. Allow to sit at room temperature while you prepare the grill. Cut the rolls in half length-wise and brush with 1 tablespoon oil. Grill the fish in a grill basket over medium heat until done, about 5 minutes per side, or until the fillets flake. Grill the rolls to slightly warm.

To make the salsa, grill the pineapple slices or heat in a pan for 5 to 10 minutes until the pineapple is browned. Dice the pineapple. Combine all the ingredients for the salsa, except for the cilantro, and allow to sit at room temperature for an hour to blend the flavors. Toss with the cilantro and spread over the fish burgers.


Yield: 4 servings
Heat Scale: Medium


Cinco de Mayo StampWe’re cooking up this classic enchilada dish in honor of Cinco de Mayo. This dish features stacked, not rolled, enchiladas covered in ground beef and pork and smothered in red chile sauce. It was originally served at the early 1960s Albuquerque restaurant, Videz. The restaurant was torn down to make way for Interstate 40, but the recipe lives on in the pages of the May/June issue of Burn!

Stacked Red Chile Enchiladas

6 to 8 dried red New Mexican chiles, stems and seeds removed
1 clove garlic
1 teaspoon ground Mexican oregano
1/2 pound pork, cubed from a roast or chops
1 to 1 and 1/2 pounds very lean ground beef
12 corn tortillas
Vegetable oil for frying
2 cups grated cheddar or Monterey Jack cheese
1 medium onion, chopped

Cover the chiles with very hot water and soak for 20 to 30 minutes or until limp and partially rehydrated. Place the chiles in the blender (they should loosely fill 3/4 of the container, if more, make two small batches.) Fill the container up near the top with water. Drop in the clove of garlic and sprinkle the top with the oregano. Add a little salt at this stage if you wish. Blend for 2 to 3 minutes on high or until a homogeneous or orangish-red mixture is obtained.

Pour the mixture into a saucepan and add the pork. Cook, covered over a very low heat or uncovered at a slight bubble, for 2 to 3 hours. If cooked uncovered, periodically add water back to original level to maintain proper consistency which I can only describe as medium soupy.
Remove the pork pieces and save for another meal such as carne adovada. Place the chile sauce in the refrigerator and cool. Remove any fat that congeals on the top.

Season the beef with a little salt and pepper and saute in a skillet until the meat is no longer pink. Combine the sauce and beef and simmer, covered, for an additional 30 to 45 minutes.
Fry three tortillas per person in a couple of inches of oil until they are slightly harder than taco shells. As they are removed from the oil with tongs, dip each into the red chile pot until they are fully submerged. Remove, place on a plate and top with some cheese and onion.
Continue the process until the tortillas are stacked three high on each plate.

Ladle red chile, including a small amount of the meat, over the tortilla stack until it is puddled up as deep as it will stand around the base of the stack. Cover the enchilada lightly with grated cheese and place in a 250 degree oven for 20 minutes.

Yield: 4 servings
Heat Scale: Medium

This article was originally posted in the Burn! Blog. Check out more great recipes and articles here.


Spicy Spring Grilling, 2

Posted by: Kelli Bergthold

Tagged in: recipe , grilling , fiery foods

Tuscan Devil ChickenTuscan Devil Chicken

In Italian, this chicken is called pollo alla diavolo because of the addition of crushed red pepperoncini chiles, the same kind that is sprinkled on pizzas to liven them up. Traditionally the chickens are split before grilling, but you can use a rotisserie if you wish–it just takes longer to cook. Adding rosemary branches to the fire makes a very aromatic smoke. Make this a true meal off the grill and serve the devil chicken with Grilled Panzananella Salad and Grilled Jalapeño Polenta.


The Chicken
1 4-pound chicken

Devil Marinade
2/3 cup dry red wine such as Chianti
1/3 cup olive oil
2 tablespoons lemon juice, fresh preferred
11/2 tablespoons finely chopped fresh rosemary or 11/2 teaspoons dried
11/2 tablespoons finely chopped fresh sage or 11/2 teaspoons dried
2 teaspoons crushed red chile, pequin for hot, New Mexican for mild
2 cloves garlic
1/4 teaspoon salt

Using poultry shears, or a heavy knife, cut down both sides of the backbone to cut the chicken in half. Remove the backbone and place the chicken on a cutting board skin side up. Press hard on the breastbone to break it and flatten the bird.
In a bowl, whisk together the marinade ingredients. Coat the chicken with the marinade, place in a plastic bag, and marinate for 2 hours in the refrigerator.
Lightly oil a clean grill surface. Remove the chicken and place the remaining marinade in a small saucepan and simmer for 20 minutes. Place chicken on the grill, skin side down and weight down with a cast iron skillet so the chicken remains flat. Grill for 15 to 20 minutes per side, basting frequently with the marinade until the juices run clear when pierced with a fork, or when the internal temperature reaches 160 degrees F. To serve, use a cleaver to chop the split chicken halves into quarters.

Yield: 4 servings
Heat Scale: Medium


Photo courtesy GailloZafferano.


Spicy Spring Grilling, 1

Posted by: Dave DeWitt

Tagged in: recipe , grilling

 

Asado Short Ribs

Noted barbecue expert Rick Browne, Ph.B., is the author of numerous books on the subject and has searched the world for great BBQ stories and recipes, like this one.  He was the host of "Barbecue America" on PBS.

Asado on the grill.

To get South American style beef ribs have the butcher cut through the bone and produce strips of ribs. So you’ll have a long strip of: meat, then a piece of bone, then meat, then bone, and so on and so forth. There’s no marinade except olive oil, a few spices, and salt and pepper—this is because you're meant to serve your meat with Chimmichurri sauce.  That recipe is here.

1/2 cup coarsely ground black pepper
1/4 cup firmly packed light brown sugar
1/4 cup sweet paprika 1/2 teaspoon garlic powder
2 tablespoons kosher or sea salt 6 pounds beef ribs, trimmed and cut across the bones
2 bottles of your favorite beer 

Preheat a charcoal or gas grill to 300 degrees F.

For the rub, in a small bowl, combine the pepper, brown sugar, paprika, garlic powder, and salt and mix well. 

Rub the ribs with the spice mixture and transfer them to a covered roasting pan or Dutch oven. Pour beer around the beef (not over it), cover the pan, and cook over direct heat on the barbecue for 3 hours.

Remove the ribs from the pan and cut into individual portions. Transfer the ribs back to the grill, close the grill cover, and cook for 5 minutes longer, or until they are crusty and tender. Serve with chimichurri sauce. 

Yield: 4 to 6 servings

 


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